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changeclocksYour HRFD Firefighters want you to put a fresh set of batteries in your smoke detectors every 6 months.  The easiest way to remember to change your Smoke Detector and Carbon Monoxide Detector Batteries is to change them when you change your clocks for Daylight Savings. 

This simple action really is your best defense to survive a fire in your home.  Although we will be racing to your aid, without the warning from smoke detectors a fire in your home at night may not even be noticed by yourself or others until it is already too late for us to save any life. This is one of a firefighter's greatest fears and is too often a reality.  Many people believe they will smell the smoke and waken but this is not likely as the toxins created by today's home fires may slowly asphyxiate those who are asleep.  A working smoke detector will quickly detect smoke at the ceiling level before the smoke can reach those sleeping below.

Your best chance to get out safely and quickly is to be alerted of the danger as quick as possible.  This is how smoke detectors have saved countless lives.

  • Please review these safety tip sheets:
    Smoke Detectors
    Carbon Monoxide (CO)
    Escape Planning
    .
  • Have a list of the battery types and quantity needed ready for your next shopping trip.
  • Replace the batteries in all your smoke detectors and ensure they are not over 10 years old and are operational.
  • Test your Smoke Detectors monthly.
  • Mark Daylight Savings on your Calendars and remind yourself to change your clocks / and your detector batteries.
  • Remind your loved ones and assist those who may have difficulty
  • Know what to do in case of a fire and practice your escape plan and meeting place... Especially when children are in the home. 
  • Get out and Stay Out! React Fast to Fire!

If you need assistance with smoke detectors and are a resident within the High Ridge Fire District please call our headquarters at 636-677-3371.

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Home fires

  • In 2011, U.S. fire departments responded to 370,000 home structure fires. These fires caused 13,910 civilian injuries, 2,520 civilian deaths, $6.9 billion in direct damage.
  • On average, seven people died in U.S. home fires per day from 2007 to 2011.
  • Cooking is the leading cause home fires and home fire injuries, followed heating equipment.
  • Smoking is a leading cause of civilian home fire deaths.
  • Most fatal fires kill one or two people. In 2012, 8 home fires killed five or more people resulting in a total of 44 deaths.

Smoke alarms - Check out the NFPA Safety Tip Sheet here.

  • Almost three of five (60%) of reported home fire deaths in 2007 to 2011 resulted from fires in homes with no smoke alarms or no working smoke alarms.
  • Working smoke alarms cut the risk of dying in reported home fires in half.
  • In fires considered large enough to activate the smoke alarm, hardwired alarms operated 93% of the time, while battery powered alarms operated only 79% of the time.
  • When smoke alarms fail to operate, it is usually because batteries are missing, disconnected, or dead.
  • An ionization smoke alarm is generally more responsive to flaming fires and a photoelectric smoke alarm is generally more responsive to smoldering fires. For the best protection, or where extra time is needed, to awaken or assist others, both types of alarms, or combination ionization and photoelectric alarms are recommended.

Escape Planning- Check out the NFPA Safety Tip Sheet here.

  • According to an NFPA survey, only one-third of Americans have both developed and practiced a home fire escape plan.
  • Almost three-quarters of Americans do have an escape plan; however, more than half never practiced it.
  • One-third (32%) of respondents who made an estimate thought they would have at least 6 minutes before a fire in their home would become life threatening. The time available is often less. Only 8% said their first thought on hearing a smoke alarm would be to get out!

Cooking- Check out the NFPA Safety Tip Sheet here.

  • U.S. Fire Departments responded to an estimated annual average of 156,600 cooking-related fires between 2007-2011, resulting in 400 civilian deaths, 5,080 civilian injuries and $853 million in direct damage.
  • Two of every five home fires started in the kitchen.
  • Unattended cooking was a factor in 34% of reported home cooking fires.
  • Two-thirds of home cooking fires started with ignition of food or other cooking materials.
  • Ranges accounted for the 57% of home cooking fire incidents. Ovens accounted for 16%.
  • Children under five face a higher risk of non-fire burns associated with cooking and hot food and drinks than being burned in a cooking fire.
  • Microwave ovens are one of the leading home products associated with scald burn injuries not related to fires. According to the National Electronic Injury Surveillance System, two out of five of the microwave oven injuries seen at emergency rooms in 2011 were scald burns.
  • Clothing was the item first ignited in less than 1% of home cooking fires, but these incidents accounted for 15% of the cooking fire deaths.

Heating- Check out the NFPA Safety Tip Sheet here.

  • The leading factor contributing to heating equipment fires was failure to clean, principally creosote from solid fueled heating equipment, primarily chimneys.
  • Portable or fixed space heaters, including wood stoves, were involved in one-third (33%) of home heating fires and four out of five (81%) home heating deaths.
  • Half of home heating fire deaths resulted from fires caused by heating equipment too close to things that can burn, such as upholstered furniture, clothing, mattresses or bedding.
  • In most years, heating equipment is the second leading cause of home fires, fire deaths, and fire injuries.
  • Fixed or portable space heaters are involved in about 4 out of 5 heating fire deaths.

Smoking materials- Check out the NFPA Safety Tip Sheet here.

  • During 2007-2011 smoking materials caused an estimated 17,900 home structure fires, resulting in 580 deaths, 1,280 injuries and $509 million in direct property damage, per year.
  • Sleep was a factor in 31% of the home smoking material fire deaths.
  • Possible alcohol impairment was a factor in one in five (18%) of home smoking fire deaths.
  • In recent years, Canada and the United States have required that all cigarettes sold must be "fire safe," that is have reduced ignition strength and less likely to start fires.

Electrical- Check out the NFPA Safety Tip Sheet here.

  • About half (48%) of home electrical fires involved electrical distribution or lighting equipment. Other leading types of equipment were washer or dryer, fan, portable or stationary space heater, air conditioning equipment water heater and range.
  • Electrical failure or malfunctions caused an average of almost 48,000 home fires per year, resulting in roughly 450 deaths and nearly $1.5 billion in direct property damage.

Candles- Check out the NFPA Safety Tip Sheet here.

  • During 2007-2011 candles caused 3% of home fires, 4% of home fire deaths, 7% of home fire injuries and 6% of direct property damage from home fires.
  • On average, there are 32 home candle fires reported per day.
  • More than one-third of these fires (36%) started in the bedroom; however, the candle industry found that only 13% of candle users burn candles in the bedroom most often.
  • Nearly three in five candle fires (56%) start when things that can burn are too close to the candle.
Reproduced from NFPA's Fire Prevention Week website, www.firepreventionweek.org. ©2014 NFPA.

Now that you know the facts check out this eye opening report aired on the Today show.

Come enjoy a night of Fright, Fun and Food at the 2014 HRFD Halloween Fun Night Saturday, October 25th.  This is a completely free event and will be open from 6pm until 9pm.  There is fun for all ages and bravery levels.  There is a child friendly environment in the lower level of the fire station where children can play fun games and everyone can get free food and refreshments.  The mildly brave can can enjoy a scary tale around the campfire and for the very brave there will be a frightening maze in the main level fire engine bay.  Don't miss this annual fall spooktacular!

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Smoke Detector Safety Reminder

 

Almost two-thirds of home fire deaths resulted from fires in homes with no smoke alarms or no working smoke alarms. When there is a fire, smoke spreads fast and you need smoke alarms to give you time to get out.Smoke alarms save lives.

  • Install smoke alarms in every bedroom, outside each separate sleeping area and on every level of the home, including the basement. Interconnect all smoke alarms throughout the home. When one sounds, they all sound.
  • An ionization smoke alarm is generally more responsive to flaming fires, and a photoelectric smoke alarm is generally more responsive to smoldering fires. For the best protection, both types of alarms or a combination alarm (photoelectric and ionization) should be installed in homes.
  • Test alarms at least monthly by pushing the test button.
  • Smoke rises; install smoke alarms following manufacturer's instructions high on a wall or on a ceiling. Save manufacturer's instructions for testing and maintenance.
  • Replace batteries in all smoke alarms at least once a year. If an alarm “chirps”, warning the battery is low, replace the battery right away.changeclocks
  • Replace all smoke alarms, including alarms that use 10-year batteries and hard-wired alarms, when they are 10 year old or sooner if they do not respond properly.
  • Be sure the smoke alarm has the label of a recognized testing laboratory.
  • Alarms that are hard-wired (and include battery backup) must be installed by a qualified electrician.
  • If cooking fumes or steam sets off nuisance alarms, replace the alarm with an alarm that has a "hush" button. A "hush" button will reduce the alarm’s sensitivity for a short period of time.
  • An ionization alarm with a hush button or a photoelectric alarm should be used if the alarm is within 20 feet of a cooking appliance.
  • Smoke alarms that include a recordable voice announcement in addition to the usual alarm sound, may be helpful in waking children through the use of a familiar voice.
  • Smoke alarms are available for people who are deaf or hard of hearing. These devices use strobe lights. Vibration devices can be added to these alarms
  • Smoke alarms are an important part of a home fire escape plan.

Daylight Savings is your reminder to change the batteries in your Smoke Detectors.

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Upcoming Events

Halloween Fun Night 2014
Sat Oct 25 @ 6:00PM - 09:00PM

Child Safety: Car Seats

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 It is estimated that 80% of children are improperly restrained!

 The HRFD Child Safety Seat Program can help assure the safety of your child passengers.
 
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Smoke Detectors Save Lives

detectorblinker2Will your Smoke Detectors save your life? It probably depends on how you treat them.

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Carbon Monoxide Poisoning

carbonmonoxideblink2Carbon Monoxide (CO) is an odorless, tasteless, invisible gas that is created from incomplete combustion. Many items that we use every day produce this deadly gas. Use the NFPA Safety Sheet to learn how to protect yourself from this common and deadly danger.

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